WHO WE ARE GET INVOLVED SPREAD THE MESSAGE LPAC 2014

Was there life on Mars?

 

Researchers have discovered rocks that could contain the fossilised remains of ancient life on early Mars.
The team made their discovery in the ancient rocks of Nili Fossae on the planet’s surface, which they say are almost identical to rocks Fake ray bans in the Pilbara region of north-west Australia where some of the earliest evidence of life on Earth has been preserved.
The findings could mean that is evidence of living organisms on Mars around 4 billion years ago buried on the planet`s surface.
Scientists from the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence Institute (Seti) used infrared light from an instrument on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter to study the Nili Fossae rocks.
They then used the exact same instrument to study the Pilbara rocks in Australia.
Scientists had first discovered that the Nili Fossae rocks contained carbonate in 2008.
Carbonate is formed when the shells Fake ray ban sunglasses  and bodies of dead animals are buried and preserved.Now they have discovered that the ancient rocks on Mars and in Australia share many similar minerals.
The similarities between the two sets of rocks in terms of carbonates is important because Pilbara is used to study the early stages of life on Earth 3.5 billion years ago.
The researchers believe they could even contain ‘stromatolites’, as at Pilbara, which are formed by ancient microbes.
Dr Adrian Brown, the paper’s author, told BBC News: ‘The Pilbara is very cool. It`s part of the Earth that has managed to stay at the surface for around 3.5 billion years - so about three quarters of the history of the Earth.’
‘It allows us a little window into what was happening on the Earth at its very early stages.’
Now the team believes that the same `hydrothermal` processes that preserved these markers of life on Earth could have taken place on Mars at Nili Fossae.
The rocks there are up to Replica ray bans four billion years old, which means they have been around for three-quarters of the history of Mars.
Dr Brown explains: `We suggest that the associated hydrothermal activity would have provided sufficient energy for biological activity on early Mars at Nili Fossae.


Print Friendly Version of this pagePrint Get a PDF version of this webpagePDF