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Civil Disobedience

 

Civil Disobedience

On this Martin Luther King, Jr. day, let us remember the important principle of nonviolent direct action that brought about an end to segregation in the South, civil disobedience.

I'd encourage our readers to spend a moment today reading through and reflecting on King's Letter from a Birmingham Jail where he specifically responds to critics of his use of civil disobedience in an effort to promote massive social change.

There comes a time when the cup of endurance runs over, and men are no longer willing to be plunged into the abyss of despair. I hope, sirs, you can understand our legitimate and unavoidable impatience. You express a great deal of anxiety over our willingness to break laws. This is certainly a legitimate concern. Since we so diligently urge people to obey the Supreme Court's decision of 1954 outlawing segregation in the public schools, at first glance it may seem rather paradoxical for us consciously to break laws. One may well ask: "How can you advocate breaking some laws and obeying others?" The answer lies in the fact that there are two types of laws: just and unjust. I would be the first to advocate obeying just laws. One has not only a legal but a moral responsibility to obey just laws. Conversely, one has a moral responsibility to disobey unjust laws. I would agree with St. Augustine that "an unjust law is no law at all." [emphasis added]

Of course, there is nothing new about this kind of civil disobedience. It was evidenced sublimely in the refusal of Shadrach, Meshach and Abednego to obey the laws of Nebuchadnezzar, on the ground that a higher moral law was at stake. It was practiced superbly by the early Christians, who were willing to face hungry lions and the excruciating pain of chopping blocks rather than submit to certain unjust laws of the Roman Empire. To a degree, academic freedom is a reality today because Socrates practiced civil disobedience. In our own nation, the Boston Tea Party represented a massive act of civil disobedience.

We should never forget that everything Adolf Hitler did in Germany was "legal" and everything the Hungarian freedom fighters did in Hungary was "illegal." It was "illegal" to aid and comfort a Jew in Hitler's Germany. Even so, I am sure that, had I lived in Germany at the time, I would have aided and comforted my Jewish brothers. If today I lived in a Communist country where certain principles dear to the Christian faith are suppressed, I would openly advocate disobeying that country's antireligious laws.

Read the rest here.

If you have time for further reading today, I'd entreat you to also read Henry David Thoreau's timeless work Civil Disobedience.  

Civil disobedience is not something to be undertaken lightly. Folks who have practiced this principle have been punished, imprisoned, and even killed throughout the centuries for doing so.  Nevertheless, there can be no more just a position than highlighting injustice in an effort to underscore the need for society to right a wrong.


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