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Government puts school bake sales on a diet

 

Government puts school bake sales on a diet

Schoolchildren hoping to hold bake sales to raise money for band trips, athletic uniforms, and field trips will have to find other means to raise money thanks to the White House’s new school nutrition guidelines.  From The Wall Street Journal:

The restrictions that took effect in July stem from the 2010 Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act championed by first lady Michelle Obama and her “Let’s Move!” campaign. The law overhauled nutrition standards affecting more than 30 million children. Among the changes: fatty french fries were out, while baked sweet potato fries were deemed to be fine.

The law also required the U.S. Department of Agriculture to set standards for all food and beverages sold during the school day, which includes vending machines, snack carts and daytime fundraisers. It allowed for “infrequent” fundraisers, and states were allowed to decide how many bake sales they would have that didn’t meet nutrition standards.

Without state-approved exemptions, any treats sold would have to meet calorie, sodium, fat and other requirements. The law permits states to fine schools that don’t comply.

Some states, such as Tennessee, are allowing bake sales to continue.

Tennessee will allow schools to sell food items that tip the federal scales for 30 days each year.

“Schools have relied on these types of sales as revenue streams for sports, cheering clubs, marching bands,” said David Sevier, deputy executive director of the Tennessee Board of Education. “We get the obesity issue, but we don’t want to jerk this out from under the kids.”


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